Environment 93 Stories

Flights from Oslo powered by biofuel

Published

26th Jan, 2016

With effect from 22 January 2016, biofuel will for the first time be pumped from the airport’s hydrant system instead of the usual tanker trucks. The biofuel will be mixed with kerosene in the hydrant system, which is comparable to using green energy. This means that the biofuel will be accessible to several airlines.

This new step in biofuel logistics is the result of cooperation between Air BP and Avinor, the Norwegian airport operator at Oslo Airport Gardermoen. The biofuel forms part of an Initiative Towards SustAinable Kerosene for Aviation (ITAKA) project funded by the European Commission and supplied by SkyNRG.

Extra flights

In addition to using biofuel from the hydrant system, some of the biofuel will be used in spring for a series of flights operated using KLM Cityhopper’s Embraer 190s.

Lower CO2 emissions

The biofuel in question is produced from camelina oil. Camelina is an oilseed crop within the flowering plant family Brassicaceae that is native to Northern Europe and Central Asia. This rotational crop does not compete with food crops. Oil can be pressed from the seeds. The biofuel will be supplied by SkyNRG, carrying RSB (Round Table of Sustainable Biomaterials) certification, attesting to its sustainability. One of the most important characteristics is that using this biofuel will reduce CO2 emissions by around 46%.

Together with partners

KLM’s current aim is to reduce CO2 emissions by 20% in 2020 – compared to 2011 levels. Measures directed at achieving this include fleet renewal, using sustainable biofuel and increasing flight efficiency. KLM is “best in class” when it comes to fuel efficiency and leads the field with respect to using sustainable biofuel.


The flights have also been made possible by the partners of the Corporate BioFuel programme. The participants pay a “premium” to bridge the price gap between biofuel and fossil fuel. In doing so, they will be contributing towards the further development of the market for biofuel, while simultaneously reducing the airline industry’s environmental impact.

ITAKA

KLM was the launch customer for biofuel first delivered by the ITAKA project. Partly as a result of this project, several biofuel flights were operated from Amsterdam to Bonaire in 2014. The flights from Oslo mark the renewal of this partnership. The ITAKA project aims to produce sustainable, renewable jet fuel to be used in existing logistics systems and during regular flight operations within Europe.

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